Monday, July 21, 2014

The winter of our discontent

My 87-year-old mother came to visit me last month and we had a five-hour drive down to Ashland, Oregon in order to see a few plays at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival. Among these was Shakespeare's Richard III, so I thought that a good road-trip audiobook would be Josephine Tey's The Daughter of Time. It was a book we've both read (a long time ago), but the "revisionist" history would be fun to revisit.

When I read this book as a teenager (young adult?), I was deep into Shakespeare and so its revelations about the Tudor Mythology were fascinating to me. Now that the poor man's bones have been dug up, the story presented in Tey's novel is kind of old news, but there's still something fun about the conceit she creates that makes it ... well, somewhat timeless. Also timeless: the argument about where he should be reburied (this "row" [as described by the BBC] appears to be over).

But I digress. Tey's novel features her detective, Alan Grant, flat on his back in a hospital bed recuperating from a nasty fall that occurred while he was pursuing a criminal. (His lengthy hospital stay truly dates this 1951 book, but I'm digressing again ....) Bored with the book options before him, his actress friend Marta Hallard suggests that he do a little armchair detecting of an historical mystery and brings him some portraits to get him started. Grant is immediately intrigued by Richard III's face (the portrait he sees is the one on the book cover, residing in the National Portrait Gallery) -- as it seems to him not that of a cold-blooded murderer (of the young Princes in the Tower [scroll down to "The yong kyng and his brother murthered"]), but of a man in some physical and psychic pain).

Aided by an enthusiastic American, Brent Carradine, who does the legwork, Grant examines the historical record and concludes that it was all a load of Tudor hooey -- designed to make Shakespeare's patron, the granddaughter of the deposer (murderer?) of Richard, the legitimate monarch and savior of England.

At the conclusion of the novel, Carradine discovers that all his work had been done by others and that the Tudor Myth had already been exposed, but never underestimate the ability of a work of fiction to bring the work of nonfiction researchers to the fore.

I want to preface my remarks about the audiobook with a nod to the conditions under which we were listening to this book, because we didn't find it a very good audiobook. Sir Derek Jacobi has few flaws as an actor, but these are all writ large when you can only hear him. (I'm pleased to see that I've been consistent about this narrator. I didn't like it the last time I listened to him either.) He uses volume to depict emotion as well as to portray Brent Carradine's Americanness. He's fairly sibilant and more than fairly juicy (lots and lots of saliva sloshing around!). We had the volume cranked up pretty high and occasionally it was just painful to listen to.

On the other hand, when there was no cause for volume and the narrator had recently swallowed, it's quite lovely listening to Sir Derek read to you. The resonance and clipped speech have a familiarity that is comforting. It's also interesting that his narrator voice is different enough so that there are no flashbacks to I, Claudius or Last Tango in Halifax. And, of course, being a well-trained English actor, he does a fine job with the character's various classes and origins, providing consistent English accents that certainly sound authentic.

However, as the driver, I also found it difficult to concentrate on this talky book. Clues are discovered and chewed over. A new direction is suggested. Carradine comes back with more information and they talk about it again. I admit I lost track of what factoid (what semi-obscure text) came up when and why it was important. It's not likely that -- if pressed -- I could come up with a single example of what Grant and Carradine discovered.

I was disturbed at the opening of the audiobook, when the anonymous male voice announcing the title could not even be bothered to give the correct full title (The was not there)!

Mom and I attended a "Preface" down at OSF for Richard III, which helped to keep all the chronology and relationships straight. The presenter also touched on the Tudor Mythology, but Mom and I felt we were already up on that!

[It was hard to pick just one of the photographs from the dig that unearthed the King, so be sure to check them all out here. This is King Richard's skeleton in situ, found on August 25, 2012. The photograph is from the University of Leicester.]

The Daughter of Time by Josephine Tey
Narrated by Derek Jacobi
BBC Audiobooks America (Chivers Audio), 1987. 5:19

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