Monday, July 21, 2014

Science guy, erudite and kind, balding but handsome

I think I came across An Available Man when I was making a readers' advisory booklist a year or so ago. The sweetness of the book appealed, I think, plus maybe its New Yorkishness. Regardless, I had some idle ears looking for a short listen a few weeks ago and found it on the shelf. Hilma Wolitzer's novel about a bereaved widower trying to get back into the swing of things was a lovely interlude.

Edward Schuyler's beloved Bee dies rapidly after a diagnosis of pancreatic cancer and she's been gone for about six months. He'd met Bee, divorced with two young children, when he'd given up dating for good -- after a disastrous relationship that ended with him stranded at the altar. They'd been married for not quite 20 years. With Bee's loss, Edward -- a 62-year-old science teacher and birdwatcher -- just can't seem to move forward. He can go through the motions, but everything reminds him of Bee. Invited to close friends' dinner party, he is appalled to see that another singleton (to borrow from another book) has been invited as well. This woman is just as irritated by the obviousness of this ploy as he is.

Not very much later, Edward's stepdaughter and stepdaughter-in-law bring over a package of letters for him to read. They've placed a personals ad (see post title) in The New York Review of Books, and these are the 40-some replies. They all go straight into the "crazy" kitchen drawer, but later Edward goes through them. He goes on a couple of disastrous dates, but -- more importantly -- he begins to see how he can go on loving Bee but be without her. And he does, of course, find another lucky woman with whom to share his life.

I found this very charming and affectionate, feeling the author’s love not only for Edward, but for his upper-middle-class, New-York-Review-of-Books-reading New York (even though Edward lives in New Jersey). Having read a "life and relationships" (one of the categories created at my library to showcase new books) novel or two (or 20) like this, I pegged Edward’s last lover practically the moment she appeared, and gnashed my teeth in frustration at his interlude with a woman who is up to no good! I also found this latter woman’s behavior not quite that of a 60-something with no discernible means of support. But that's a quibble.

The audiobook is narrated by Fred Sullivan (whoever this generically named narrator may be). He does a fine job with this novel, reading with an accessible and friendly baritone. Edward's warmth and underlying grief is evident in Sullivan's reading of the third-person narration. He reads at a subtly varied pace and never forgets the story's humor or its occasional flashes of irony. Sullivan reveals the novel's characters through natural voices, easy to distinguish and pleasant to listen to. There's nothing here not to like. A perfect summer read/listen.

I'm generally not a personals ad reader, but perusing the ones at the Review is kind of fun! And since I'm at a certain age (and not looking), I found the real estate ones equally dreamy. Can you take a prospective mate and visit "PARIS. Attractive, furnished 3-room apartment, between Bastille and République, 11th Arrondissement, elevator building, kitchen and bathroom, maid weekly, €2,500 a month."? 

[Edward spots an old flame at the Museum of Modern Art exhibit Marina Abramović: The Artist is Present, where viewers entered a gallery by squeezing through the space between two naked individuals. This image of Abramović's work is one suitable for all readers. It's from a film, The Future of Art, posted by the cinematographer -- Christian Görmer -- to Wikimedia Commons.

[A sample of the personals appearing in the Review, retrieved from the publication's website.]

An Available Man by Hilma Wolitzer
Narrated by Fred Sullivan
AudioGO, 2012. 7:47

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